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Category: P1: feedback

Val Murray (Tea collaborative) feedback

Val contacted me after seeing my Drifting by … project in the Redeye Photographic Network newsletter – mainly to point me in the direction of work by the Tea collaborative group on the canal 20 years ago (http://www.teaweb.org/the-cut.html). However, I also took the opportunity to request some feedback from her, as an experienced artist who has a collaborated on exhibitions of performance based art. A PDF of the email exchange is attached.

Val commented that it is tricky to work with the range of different inputs in the film and suggests that my idea of disconnecting the elements might work well. Interestingly, she talks about how Tea worked and reflects, with hindsight, that their projects tended to be overloaded and she feels that less may have been more. Also that in some cases they made a completely new piece of work to document/share the performance, which she feels worked better.

Val’s comments have further encouraged me to think in the direction of producing a simplified output that is not so multilayered, or the existing layers are separated and presented differently.

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Paul Hill Feedback

I wrote to renowned photographer Paul Hill, whose work White Peak Dark Peak, has influenced my way of thinking about landscapes. Our correspondence is attached.

In summary, Paul thought there were some wonderful images of the canal but found the ‘commentary’ distracting as he felt it tells what is about to be seen. When I produced the video, this was by design as I originally found chance alignment in some parts distracting, by creating a mental hunt for other patterns of alignment.

Paul’s comments have prompted me to rethink an idea of showing the video alongside prints in an exhibition. Perhaps, just the ambient sounds could be playing? The video could be watched via a QR code on an info sheet? The narrative verses could be printed and displayed, with a QR code to listen to the spoken narrative.

All food for thought.

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Feedback on Press Release

I was interviewed by Yorkshire Post journalist Ruby Kitchen for an upcoming article on Drifting by the Leeds and Liverpool. While I didn’t ask for feedback on the press release, it was kindly given, saying that ‘I must be very experienced in issuing press releases as it’s exactly in the format that journalists like it, and include files to download also’. I didn’t confess to it being my first press release but was happy that my research and time editing is was worthwhile!

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Feedback from Adobe on Portfolio site

Feedback received

When using Adobe Portfolio, Adobe offer the opportunity for site to be submitted for review by an ‘industry professional’ by completing an online form with information about the project and a short artists statement. It is made clear that only a few sites will be selected for review as part of the ‘Adobe Creative Residency’ initiative. I submitted my site sometime ago and unfortunately didn’t capture a copy of the online submission, so am not sure of the exact date. However, I was pleasantly surprised to receive some feedback from Adobe by email on my project website (https://www.leedsandliverpool.co.uk) that has given me much to think about in terms of online presentation of work. The email also provided links to resources.

Response to feedback

Here I note the points that I intend to address through further experimentation with the website:

  • There are a few comments that refer to ease of viewing / simplifying the website on the basis of visitors being busy/lazy. Having lived with the work for a while and experienced the presentation of other photographers, I realise it is easy to become over-immersed in one’s own work at the risk of making it inaccessible to the busy (semi-interested) viewer. Specifics to consider are:
    • Simplifying the structure to fewer sections to show as much work as possible straight away. The web viewer comes with a different expectation than someone thumbing through a book or visiting a physical exhibition. It is a question of being more mindful of the output medium and viewer expectations of it.
    • Make the still images bigger / more plentiful; avoid the need for the viewer to have to click on images to appreciate the detail
    • The reviewer mentions they’d like to understand more of the personal connection to the project – this may currently be lost in the separated text. There’s a suggestion of placing some quotes next to the images for a stronger impact. There is of course the risk of text determining the meaning of images to consider.
    • Suggests that the front page is unnecessary and it may be better to go right to the images/video right away.
    • Suggests that a white background to the website throughout would look more professional. I chose alternative black and white to echo the colours of the canal, but this would probably be lost on most viewers in any case.

The resource links provided into the email cover a range of subjects connected to portfolios. I intend to read those and summarise salient points in a separate post.

So, the outcome of this will be to revisit the design of my project’s website. This will go straight to the top of my list as the website underpins other communications.

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